Menu
Next Race
Free Bets
My Account
Tracker

Jockeys banned following void race to appeal against ten-day suspensions

The flag being waved after the last fence at Perth
1 of 1

Jockeys Sean Quinlan, Derek Fox and Stephen Mulqueen will appeal against the ten-day bans they received for riding on in a Perth novice handicap chase on Monday that was declared void.

The three riders were given the suspensions for failing to stop riding despite yellow flags being waved. The race had been stopped so that the injured Johnny Go could be treated, but sadly he suffered fatal injuries.

Paul Struthers, chief executive of the Professional Jockeys Association, said in a tweet: "An appeal on behalf of Stephen Mulqueen, Sean Quinlan and Derek Fox against decision of the Stewards @PerthRacecourse has been submitted."

Fox, who had on Tuesday called the ban 'harsh' but was undecided on whether to appeal, said on Wednesday: "The three of us spoke to each other, and to the PJA, and after seeking a couple of other opinions we've decided to appeal.

"I did feel the ban was quite harsh, I only saw the flag very late, and having spoken to a few people I feel we'd have a good chance of getting the length reduced at least."

No date for the appeal could be confirmed, but it will have to take place before September 26, the day that the three riders will start their suspension, which will run for ten consecutive days.

The original decision by the Perth stewards met with severe criticism from former champion jockey Peter Scudamore, who said: "If the officials can't make a decision with a circuit to go, how can the jockeys make a decision in a split second?

"By delaying the decision they increased the chances of something going wrong, and they didn't consider the difficulties for the jockeys."

Quinlan, who rode well-backed favourite Red Giant, had himself expressed that he felt the race could have finished as normal.

"There was nothing in front of the third-last, there was nothing in front of the second-last, and there was nothing in front of the last, and we had plenty of room to go through to the finish line," he said.

By delaying the decision they increased the chances of something going wrong, and they didn't consider the difficulties for the jockeys