SEARCH FOR HEADLINE

FROM DATE*

Calendar

TO DATE

Calendar

 

News stories which have appeared on the website are available free of charge but stories which have appeared in the newspaper are only available when you join Members' Club. *NOTE: The archive runs from January 1, 2006 to present

Primitivo (Willie Twiston-Davies)

Primitivo: is joining Richard Gibson in Hong Kong

  PICTURE: Edward Whitaker (racingpost.com/photos)  

Primitivo to continue career in Hong Kong

HONG KONG has acquired another Royal Ascot winner as news broke on Wednesday that Primitivo has been sold to continue his racing career abroad.

The three-year-old gave Alan King his first victory at the royal meeting when landing the King George V Handicap last month, 35 minutes after the Britannia Stakes victory of Jamie Osborne's Defrocked, who is also heading to the Far East.

"Primitivo has been sold to Richard Gibson in Hong Kong and we wish him well with him," King said on Wednesday.

"He is due to leave tomorrow and we will be sad to see him go but you can't take away the day we had with him at Royal Ascot, that was right up there with the best moments of my career. I love the royal meeting and to have a winner there was very special."

Primitivo is unbeaten this year, having won handicaps at Newbury and Sandown prior to Ascot. He raced for a syndicate of four, including Brian Cognet and Russell Field, who with his wife Lesley, bred Primitivo.

'Our plan is to reinvest'

It took a seven-figure sum to prize away the son of Excellent Art, who only cost 10,000 guineas as a yearling.

Russell Field said of the deal: "We had to take it while it was there. It was lovely to have had him and obviously we would have liked to carry on but we must be sensible."

The Fields will be hoping Primitivo's half-sister, who they also have, will be as successful when she reaches the track.

"Our plan is to reinvest in British and Irish racing," Field added. "The money is not really for us, it is for racing. Our hearts are really in National Hunt racing and, rather than thinking of British racing losing a great horse , we should look at it as leaving a vacuum for another great horse to fill the void."   

 
News Archive

Search