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DAVID CARR

Weblog: What do you mean the Wi-Fi doesn't work? The life of a Racing Post reporter

Tom's top treble and tales of the unexpected

Wolverhampton on a Friday night? Nothing ever happens there. Really? You have clearly never been.

True, it's never going to be confused with the first day of the Cheltenham Festival but there is plenty going on.

Take tonight. A good night for Tom Queally, operating as a freelance this year and showing that he is unlikely to be too hard a sell for his agent by riding a 53-1 treble for three different trainers.

Possibly an even better night for Graham Gibbons, who cruelly broke a collar bone when just two winners short of a century in 2013 and made an immediate start on his 100 for this season on his comeback.

He remains a slightly unheralded jockey but he is a mighty effective one and he looked as good as ever on Singzak, judging things perfectly from the front and showing the strength to straighten his mount up when he started to edge into the runner-up inside the final furlong.

There are always tells of the unexpected at Wolverhampton as well.

You don't expect a trainer to tell you their runner will be beaten by the horse who finished second to him last time but Scott Dixon was right, a 6lb penalty and a switch away from Southwell proved too much for Sir Geoffrey (who was only running as there is nothing for him on fibresand until mid-March).

You don't expect to find a loose scrap of material under the table on the corridor outside the press room.

Nor to bend down to pick it up and discover it is actually part of the anorak of a small child who had clearly tired of seeking out the winners and was playing hide and seek.

At the risk of upsetting my hosts, I have to end with a toast to an absent friend, Nathan Corden - the head of commercial development at Southwell, Worcester and here until parting from Arena Racing Company this week.

He was a veritable hero of the two floods which took Southwell to the brink of extinction and he remains a good man and a class act.

That last description was perfectly illustrated by the arch sublety of his parting comment in today's Racing Post: "I had eight fantastic years with Arena Leisure plc and then I worked for Arc for 22 months."

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